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Doing it with style

CSS DEMOSA multi-choice selection box

Date : 14th October 2006

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      My love is as a fever

      Sonnet 147

      by William Shakespeare

      William Shakespeare

      My love is as a fever, longing still
      For that which longer nurseth the disease,
      Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill,
      Th' uncertain sickly appetite to please.
      My reason, the physician to my love,
      Angry that his prescriptions are not kept,
      Hath left me, and I desperate now approve
      Desire is death, which physic did except.
      Past cure I am, now reason is past care,
      And frantic-mad with evermore unrest;
      My thoughts and my discourse as mad men's are,
      At random from the truth vainly expressed.
      For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright,
      Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.

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      London 1802

      a poem

      by William Wordsworth

      William Wordsworth

      Milton! thou should'st be living at this hour:
      England hath need of thee: she is a fen
      Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen,
      Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower,
      Have forfeited their ancient English dower
      Of inward happiness. We are selfish men;
      Oh! raise us up, return to us again;
      And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power.
      Thy soul was like a Star, and dwelt apart:
      Thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea:
      Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free,
      So didst thou travel on life's common way,
      In cheerful godliness; and yet thy heart
      The lowliest duties on herself did lay.

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      Beshrew that heart

      Sonnet 133

      by William Shakespeare

      William Shakespeare

      Beshrew that heart that makes my heart to groan
      For that deep wound it gives my friend and me!
      Is't not enough to torture me alone,
      But slave to slavery my sweet'st friend must be?
      Me from my self thy cruel eye hath taken,
      And my next self thou harder hast engrossed.
      Of him, myself, and thee I am forsaken-
      A torment thrice threefold thus to be crossed.
      Prison my heart in thy steel bosom's ward,
      But then my friend's heart let my poor heart bail;
      Whoe'er keeps me, let my heart be his guard,
      Thou canst not then use rigour in my jail.
      And yet thou wilt; for I, being pent in thee,
      Perforce am thine, and all that is in me.

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      Desire

      a poem

      by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

      Samuel Taylor Coleridge

      Where true Love burns Desire is Love's pure flame;
      It is the reflex of our earthly frame,
      That takes its meaning from the nobler part,
      And but translates the language of the heart.

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      My Mistress eyes

      Sonnet 130

      by William Shakespeare

      William Shakespeare

      My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
      Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
      If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
      If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
      I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
      But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
      And in some perfumes is there more delight
      Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
      I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
      That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
      I grant I never saw a goddess go;
      My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
      And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
      As any she belied with false compare.

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      Beauty

      a poem

      by John Masefield

      John Masefield

      Have seen dawn and sunset on moors and windy hills
      Coming in solemn beauty like slow old tunes of Spain:
      I have seen the lady April bringing in the daffodils,
      Bringing the springing grass and the soft warm April rain.

      I have heard the song of the blossoms and the old chant of the sea,
      And seen strange lands from under the arched white sails of ships;
      But the loveliest things of beauty God ever has showed to me
      Are her voice, and her hair, and eyes, and the dear red curve of her lips.

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      Shall I compare thee to a summers day

      Sonnet 18

      by William Shakespeare

      William Shakespeare

      Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
      Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
      Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
      And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
      Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
      And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
      And every fair from fair sometime declines,
      By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed.
      But thy eternal summer shall not fade
      Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
      Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
      When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st,
      So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
      So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

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      Landscape one

      Caption one

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Landscape two

      Caption two

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Landscape three

      Caption three

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Landscape four

      Caption four

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Landscape five

      Caption five

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Landscape six

      Caption six

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Landscape seven

      Caption seven

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Portrait one

      Caption one

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Portrait two

      Caption two

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Portrait three

      Caption three

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Portrait four

      Caption four

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Portrait five

      Caption five

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Portrait six

      Caption six

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Portrait seven

      Caption seven

      Description of photo can go here.

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      Welcome to CSSplay

      "Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a simple mechanism for adding style (e.g. fonts, colors, spacing) to Web documents."

      The above quote, taken from w3c.org, is one of the reasons for this site. Whilst I agree that it is a mechanism for adding style to web documents, I do not agree that it is a SIMPLE mechanism. It can be very complicated, as I found out when I took my first steps down this path. CSSplay, by the way, is now listed on the w3c.org website.

      So I have created this site in the hope that it will help newcomers to CSS and show old hands that it is more than just a mechanism for styling your documents. It is oh so much more.

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      Use the correct DocType Definition

      (DTD)

      Please , please, please note that for most of my demonstrations to work, especially in Internet Explorer, you MUST use a standards compliant !DOCTYPE, and for Internet Explorer this MUST be the first line of your (x)html.
      Using <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> will switch IE into quirks mode.

      A list of the recommended DTDs can be found at the following link:
      Recommended DTDs to use in your Web document.

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      A little bit about me

      Me

      I am 60 years old, married with two children, work as an electronics design draughtsman and have a passion for computers and photography.

      I started out with computers in the 1980s when I began writing articles on the ZX81 and ZX Spectrum for the computer magazines of the time. I was also commissioned by McGraw-Hill to write two books on Z80 programming for the ZX Spectrum.

      The web was the next big attraction and once more I have become hooked, as you can no doubt tell, with CSS. This site has been around for just over a year now and, although not as well known as 'the big boys' it is not doing too badly.

      I thank you all for your support and comments and should you wish to link back to CSSplay please feel free to use this button.

      CSSplay button
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      What happened to my previous home pages?

      The alternative styles and my javascript switcher have been dropped from this new layout, primarily because any changes I wanted to make to this home page required updating the CSS for every style.

      However, these styles have not been lost. If you wish to see my previous home pages then visit my archives.

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      But where's the code?

      I have had many emails asking where the code/style can be found for the various demonstrations.

      Well the xhtml is always placed in the #info div, so examine the source code, find the <div id="info">.....</div> and in between is the 'code'.

      In most case the style is embeded in the page <head>...</head>. This is done to keep it all together on the same page making it easier to find. In some cases the css is held in a separate file (where it should be) and is loaded in the normal way <link rel="stylesheet" media="all" type="text/css" href="path to css file.css" /> so just add this path to the address in your browser to see the css file.

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      Copyright

      Most of my demonstrations can be used without asking for permission. However, some will require email approval first. Just check each page for the copyright requirements before use.

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      Information

      CSSplay is fast becoming the number one site for CSS demonstrations and cutting edge techniques and as such is attracting web designers, developers and organizations from all over the world. These visitors take an interest in the latest web design standards, techniques and related internet information.

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      Pablo Picasso

      The Old Guitarist

      The Spaniard Pablo Picasso and the Frenchman Georges Braque splintered the visual world not wantonly, but sensuously and beautifully with their new art. They provided what we could almost call a God's-eye view of reality: every aspect of the whole subject, seen simultaneously in a single dimension.

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      Henri Matisse

      Flowers in a Pitcher

      Matisse's artistic career was long and varied, covering many different styles of painting from Impressionism to near Abstraction.

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      David Hockney

      Mr and Mrs Clark and Percy

      His early paintings, often almost jokey in mood, gained him a reputation of leading Pop artist, although he himself rejected the label.

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      Raphael

      Madonna dell Granduca

      Raphael is best known for his Madonnas and for his large figure compositions in the Vatican in Rome. His work is admired for its clarity of form and ease of composition and for its visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur.

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      Michelangelo

      The Holy Family with the infant St. John the Baptist

      Italian Renaissance sculptor, painter, architect, and poet who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art.

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      Pieter Bruegel

      Peasant wedding

      Pieter Bruegel the Elder, generally considered the greatest Flemish painter of the 16th century, is by far the most important member of the family. He was probably born in Breda in the Duchy of Brabant, now in The Netherlands.

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      Hans Holbein the Younger

      Sir Richard Southwell

      In England, where he became court painter to Henry VIII, Holbein was known chiefly as a painter of portraits. His services were much in demand. The more than 100 miniature and full-size portraits he completed at Henry's court provide a remarkable document of that colorful period.

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Information

Following on from the previous example and combining the knowledge gained from the recent series of pull-up menus, this one is a multi-choice method of displaying information.

I have chosen to use colours for the selection boxes but this could equally as well be text or images.

This is just to show that the content can be displayed in many ways, text and float left images, landscape and portrait images with caption text, content text with inline links, images of various shapes and sizes with accompanying text and finally vertically and horizontally centred images or text.

Just hover over the grey boxes to display a further color choice menu, hover over any color to display information in the area above.

Please note that you will also need a standards compliant !doctype for this system to work correctly.


Because of all the time and effort spent in producing this demonstration I would ask that you respect my copyright.

  1. If you are using this on a personal web site then please retain the copyright comment in the stylesheet.
    A support donation is now required for this demonstration.
  2. If you are using this on a commercial web site, or as a paying job for a client, then please email me asking for permission - stu{at}cssplay.co.uk and again a support donation is required.
  3. If you are having problems integrating any of my demonstrations into your website then I now offer a service to fault find and correct any errors that you may have introduced. Please email me for more information.

Support CSSPLAY

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